Delta Air to tighten onboard emotional support animal requirements

Delta Air to tighten onboard emotional support animal requirementsDelta Air Lines is tightening the requirements for passengers traveling with onboard service and emotional support animals, the carrier said on Friday, following a sharp uptick in animal-related safety issues over the last several years. Effective March 1, Delta, the second largest U.S. airline by passenger traffic, said it will require passengers seeking to fly with pets to present additional documents outlining passenger's need for the animal and proof of the animal's training and vaccinations, 48 hours prior to the scheduled flight. This comes in response to what the carrier said was a 150 percent increase in the number of service and support animals carried onboard since 2015.



Trump to address U.S. anti-abortion march, cementing U-turn on issue

Trump to address U.S. anti-abortion march, cementing U-turn on issueDonald Trump will become the third sitting U.S. president to address anti-abortion activists at the annual March for Life on Friday, highlighting his shift in recent years from a supporter of women's access to abortion to a powerful opponent. Trump is due to address the march in Washington via satellite from the White House Rose Garden on Friday afternoon. Ronald Reagan, Trump's fellow Republican, made supportive remarks to the march in 1987 via telephone, while George W. Bush, another Republican, twice did the same, in 2003 and 2004.



Supreme Court blocks redrawing of North Carolina congressional maps

Supreme Court blocks redrawing of North Carolina congressional mapsThe U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday blocked a lower court's order for North Carolina to rework its congressional map because Republicans violated the Constitution by drawing electoral districts intended to maximize their party's chances of winning. The conservative-majority court granted a bid by Republican legislators in North Carolina to suspend the Jan. 9 order by a federal court panel in Greensboro that gave the Republican-controlled General Assembly until Jan. 24 to come up with a new map for U.S. House of Representatives districts.



Trump administration appeals against 'Dreamer' immigrant ruling to top court

Trump administration appeals against 'Dreamer' immigrant ruling to top courtBy Lawrence Hurley WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Justice Department asked the Supreme Court on Thursday to quickly overturn a lower court ruling that blocked President Donald Trump's move to end a program that protects hundreds of thousands of immigrants brought to the United States illegally as children. Solicitor General Noel Francisco said in a court filing "time is of the essence" and asked the high court to rule on the case before its current term ends in June. The Republican president in September rescinded, effective in March, the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, program put in place in 2012 by his Democratic predecessor, Barack Obama.



Trump move on healthcare religious freedom prompts discrimination fears

Trump move on healthcare religious freedom prompts discrimination fearsThe Trump administration's move on Thursday to protect healthcare workers who refuse to perform abortions and other medical procedures on religious or moral grounds is raising fears among some civil rights and medical groups that it will provide legal cover for otherwise unlawful discrimination. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services created a new Conscience and Religious Freedom Division within its Office of Civil Rights to enforce the rights of doctors, nurses and others who invoke such objections. James Blumstein, a professor at Vanderbilt Law School in Tennessee, said the administration's plan could remedy what he described as years of overreach by the federal government fighting discrimination against patients at the expense of the religious freedom of healthcare professionals.





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